Electric Fencing Articles and Information.

Electric fencing articles that will advance the knowledge and ability to use Electric fencing.

  • "Electric Fence" Kills an Elephant.

    One of the major concerns about Electric Fencing is whether it is safe or not. This is covered in some detail in an earlier posting on this blog and just to highlight the difference  between standard mains electricity and electric fencing there are numerous incidences, particularly in India, where animals and humans have been killed or injured by "Electric Fences" that have been connected directly to a mains supply. This is invariably by a poor farmer who has seen the effectiveness of electric fencing and his meagre crops are being ruined by animals. He then looks at ways to protect himself and his crops so settles on an "Electric Fence" little realising that there is a big difference between ...

  • Does Electric Fencing Cause Stress in your Horse.

    I am often asked if horses are put under stress when they are in an electrified fence irrespective if they show no outward signs of stress. I was pleased to come across this scientific study from a Swiss University evaluating the stress levels of horses under the sort of situations they encounter. "Most horses respect electric fences, but can they be a source of stress in their lives? Swiss researchers have found no evidence of any stress response in horses as a result of being contained within electric fencing. It did not matter whether the enclosed area was large or small, with the smaller of the two areas assessed being no bigger than a conventional stable.Temporary electric fencing is increasingly ...

  • Frequently Asked Questions.

    Is Electric Fencing Safe for my Horses?Why is electric fence better than other types of horse fences? What's the best way to fence aggressive horses or stallions? How do I prevent "cribbing" or Wind Sucking? Is electric fence safe for my pets? A reason for shorting? Crocodile clips give a good connection? When is the best time to check the power in your fence? Pigs and electric fencing? Where to put your earth stake? What is an electric fence system made up of and how does it work? How do I start building my electric fence? How do I choose the most suitable electric fence energiser? What is the most common installation error with electric fencing? My climate and soil make it difficult for me ...

  • Oldest working Electric Fence Energiser

    There are often queries as to how long an energiser will last for and it is difficult to give a quantitative response. I know of energisers being active well in excess of 10 years but it does depend on how the energiser is housed and if it is worked to its capacity limits. All our energisers have a minimum 3 year warranty and many in excess of that. Horizont recently ran an advertised competition to find their oldest working, functioning energiser and a model manufactured in 1955 was found still working on a dairy farm outside Soest, Dortmund. This was closely followed by one manufactured in 1957 and another in 1958. All electric fence energisers were still working. This then will give you some ...

  • Elderly horse scared of an electric fence

    A concerned customer who had moved his  31-year-old gelding to a new boarding facility six days ago contacted me for an opinion. The farm owner put him in outdoor pen with electric fence tape, which he's never seen before. He hit it, freaked out, ran to other side of the pen, hit the fence again and freaked out. He was so scared that he was soaking wet with sweat. The owner shut off the electricity and calmed the horse down. Naturally he is concerned about the future for his horse. My experience tells me that 99.9% of horses settle down and are not bothered by the electric fence after getting the first shock and respect it. What bothers me is that he blundered into the tape on two occasions. ...

  • Fantastic African scenes cast in Bronze

    Growing up in the middle of Africa we were a tight knit community who played and drank together. One of my compatriots was a cattle rancher who dabbled with paints - pretty good at it truth be told. He supplemented his operations by becoming a professional hunter until that operation became the most lucrative side of his business and went full time. This close association with wildlife enabled the artist in John to fine tune his anatomical appreciation of his future subjects. Being the artist at heart, John took up sculpture and began producing bronze figures. John has moved on from his hunting days and now produces bronze sculptures of African wildlife scenes as a full time occupation. The detail ...

  • 150 Dead Hens from a Fox Attack.

    An email was received requesting help on why a fox had been able to penetrate an electric netting system and slaughter 150 hens. 150 hens taken by one fox is quite a catastrophe and by far the largest we have come across. The image below indicates the scale of the predation. The enclosure utilises standard poultry nets on a 12 joule energiser, so seriously powerful and illegal in Europe. It has been in position for over 4 years without incident. Looking at the image there is quite clearly a serious challenge from a thick sward of lush green grass. This has to be drawing all the energy from the net despite the strength of the energiser. Each blade of grass touching the net will be drawing ...

  • Monkey learns to short circuit an Electric Fence.

    A love-sick monkey desperate to flee her enclosure to be with her mate has learned how to short circuit an electric fence - with a wet blade of GRASS. Bella, a Sulawesi crested black macaque, was left distraught after zookeepers removed dominant male Malino from her pen. She and a group of female pals managed to clamber out and search for him, prompting staff at Jersey's Durrell Wildlife Park to erect an electric fence. But lovestruck Bella refuse to give up and soon devised a way to short the power by prodding the charged wire with wet foliage. Keepers rigged up a second layer of fencing but crafty Bella simply adapted her trick by balancing a blade of grass across the two. The pink-bottomed ...

  • Electric Fencing in Dry Soil Conditions.

    All energisers provide a pulse of energy that originates from their 'hot' terminal then travels down the fence line on a charged or 'hot' wire. Most users understand this aspect of electric fencing. It's fairly obvious that the hot wires can't be touching a steel post or laying on the soil surface. What's not so obvious is that in the instant when an animal comes into contact with that charged wire, its body contains that energy but is not shocked… yet! In order to provide a shock and thus the respect for the fence, the energy must travel out of the animal's feet, through the soil, into the energiser's ground rods, then into the energiser's ground terminal. At that point, the circuit has ...

  • Curing a horse immune to electricity

    I was at a function over the weekend and I was buttonholed by a lady who insisted that she had a horse that was immune to electricity and "laughed" at electric fencing. This was a challenge I could not resist and made an appointment to visit her yard. The yard is well appointed and well looked after. It had an energiser from a well known company but the fence was reading 2500v - well down on what could be considered a competent fence. Quickly found a couple of faults so increasing that to nearly 4000v - getting better. In order to improve my chances of "fixing" her Houdini I substituted that with a HotShock energiser so increasing the energy in the fence to 7000v. My next tactic was to attach ...

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